Fashion

‘Hair training’ is the TikTok-approved method of teaching hair to clean itself – but does it work?

If you’re among the 60% of people who wash their hair daily, you’ll know that it can feel more like a chore than an act of self care. Not only is it time consuming, it’s also expensive, with shampoo and conditioner constantly needing to be topped up. 

But what’s the alternative? Aside from the occasional day-two dry shampoo, which has its own downfalls (hello, itchy scalp), there’s not much to be done to avoid the daily wash cycle. Or is there?

According to TikTok, it’s possible to ‘train’ your hair to clean itself in order to reduce the frequency of washes. But does it work? And is it actually good for your scalp? We’ve called upon expert trichologists to explain the theory behind hair training and clear up any misunderstandings. 

What is “hair training”?

Hair training is the process of gradually prolonging the time in between wash days, working up to a 30 day gap. The theory is that your scalp will adjust to fewer washes and produce less oil, meaning your hair won’t get greasy so quickly. 

It went viral on TikTok when creator @HayleeJ revealed she hadn’t washed her hair for 25 days, yet it still looked salon fresh. Followers were quick to demand to know how they, too, could start hair training.

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Halyee explained that over the course of a year, she worked up from washing her hair every four days to just once per month. “It took me a full year to get to where I am now, which is, I only wash my hair once a month,” she says in her video. “My scalp is now used to that.”

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Does it work? 

Ultimately, opinion is split. According to some hair experts, there is a certain element of truth to the hair training theory, namely that if you wash your hair less often, your scalp will produce less oil and your hair won’t look greasy as quickly.