Lifestyle

London Is The Most Sustainable Shopping City In The UK

We’re the top of the top. The best of the best. When it comes to sustainable shopping, we beat all the rest. We’re the top of the heap. Well, in the UK at least.

Recent research by Betway has shown that London is the number one destination in the UK when it comes to the sheer number of sustainable shopping venues. We didn’t quite place in the top when it comes to international cities – with cities across America dominating the top 10. But we did come in at a not-too-shabby third place compared to cities across Europe.

The rankings were determined based on how many venues existed in each city for second-hand and thrift purchases. The data included “the number of vintage, thrift, charity and second–hand shops, plus the number of flea markets, car boot and garage sales.” So if you feel like you’ve well and truly hit up every thrift store in London, looking for that perfect holy-grail purchase, you may still have other places to look!

Sustainable Shopping in the UK
Credit: Betway

Anyone who has walked down a London street has seen the charity shops always increasing in number. It’s clear that we’re more than just a luxury international shopping destination. We’re also a city of conscientious and careful shoppers and fashionistas. And if you truly do exhaust all of your options in London, just head up to Liverpool, which came in second in the list of UK cities with a grand total of 241 sustainable shopping options.

Among the other insights uncovered in the research done by Betway were the following:

  • Berlin is at the top of the heap in Europe, with 296 sustainable shopping locations.
  • Los Angeles bossed the sustainable shopping game in America, with 408 sustainable shopping venues – the most in the world.
  • New York had the second highest number in both the States and internationally, with 379.
  • The UK does the most searching for vintage football shirts. No one even came close – with 5,900 monthly searches compared to second place America’s measly 500 monthly searches.

You can read the full results here.